Manufacturing

UAE and Egypt’s consortium to buy African renewables firm Lekela Power

Lekela Power 10 MayA consortium of UAE-based Masdar and Egypt’s Infinity Energy is set to buy a majority stake in Lekela Power from private equity vehicle Actis


According to a report from Reuters, the value of the sale could be worth close to US$1bn.

The deal would provide Masdar with its first assets in southern Africa.

Lekela Power has a portfolio of more than 1GW of wind assets across South Africa, Egypt and Senegal in addition to a 225MW wind project in Ghana. It had begun commercial operations of its 250MW West Bakr wind project in Egypt.

The West Bakr wind farm will produce more than 1,000GWh of renewable electricity every year, which will save more than 530,000 tonnes of carbon dioxide annually.

Lekela has developed the project under a build, own, operate (BOO) model. The developer received financing from the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD), the International Finance Corporation (IFC) and the US’ Development Finance Corporation.

Completion of the project has increased Egypt’s installed wind capacity by 18%.

Actis has put BioTherm Energy (BTE) Renewables, another Africa-focused renewable company, up for sale as well, Reuters reported.

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Enable a major leap in operational efficiency by giving every asset a unique digital identity

RFID Digital ID 1000x700With Brady Corporation's complete RFID solution, assets in any industrial environment can be given unique digital identities just by applying a label

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Averda receives IFC funding to support waste management in Africa

IFC signing pic2The International Finance Corporation (IFC) has signed a landmark agreement with Averda International, one of the largest privately owned integrated waste management companies in the Middle East and Africa, to help bring innovative waste solutions to emerging markets in the two regions

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Falcon Corporation, ND Western & FHN Consortium partners with Lagos Free Zone

Lagos free Zone 26 AprilA consortium of Falcon Corporation, ND Western Midstream Limited & FHN Gas Limited, has been selected to build, own, and operate a naturalgas distribution infrastructure network within the Lagos Free Zone (LFZ)

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Internal climbing setup enables Potain cranes to fast-track Boston tower

internal climbing 25 MayThe Potain MR 415 and MR 418 A tower cranes are quietly growing along with the building — and also inside it


Forming part of the western parcel of the 4.8-acre Bulfinch Crossing mixed-use development, a stone’s throw from Boston City Hall, the imposing new building tops out at around 565 ft and offers spectacular views over the city and harbor. The innovative approach to its construction was a result of the desire to begin leasing space within the tower as quickly as possible, explained Cori Amadon, vice-president at James F Stearns, the leading crane provider for the project.

Core skills

Using Potain MR cranes on the project was an inspired choice. The interchangeability of their bases with those of its sister ranges, the MD and MDT models, increased the number of installation options for internal and external climbing configurations.

Demolition of an adjoining car park exposed a row of four connected concrete core cells that provided fully enclosed support for the climbing mechanism for the Potain MR 415. The MR 418 A was then added to the outside of the westernmost cell, where it too would soon be largely obscured from view by the steel frame of the tower being built around it.

In collaboration with engineering firm Howard I. Shapiro & Associates, plans were drawn up for each stage of the MR 415’s upward journey. For Phase 1, the initial installation, the crane would be freestanding, with just under 197 ft of mast, and a similar jib length. 

The contractor’s desire for a spacious working platform had left a gap of mere inches around the mast perimeter and the core walls, leaving the riggers with no opportunity to assemble or drop in the mast from above. Instead, the beams were pulled into the bottom of the core through a doorway, assembled at ground level, and then maneuvered into position by crane and/or air tuggers.

The crane climbed another 90 ft during each of the next two stages, with a second diving board added at level 32 during Phase 4 and a third board seven floors later during Phase 5, by which time the structure had reached level 42. For the final push, Phase 6, one last climb of 88 ft would be sufficient to enable topping off in July 2021, with the crane supported by the diving boards on levels 32 and 39.

“One of the unique things about this project is that it has a four-cell system from ground level up to level 25, and then one of the cells ‘disappears’ and it turns into a three-cell core,” Amadon explained. “So, initially we were working internally surrounded by a concrete cell up to level 25, but then we had to come out of that and switch from a four-sided support system to utilising a diving board system on the outside of the core.”

The crane climbed another 90 ft during each of the next two stages, with a second diving board added at level 32 during Phase 4 and a third board seven floors later during Phase 5, by which time the structure had reached level 42. For the final push, Phase 6, one last climb of 88 ft would be sufficient to enable topping off in July 2021, with the crane supported by the diving boards on levels 32 and 39.

“One of the unique things about this project is that it has a four-cell system from ground level up to level 25, and then one of the cells ‘disappears’ and it turns into a three-cell core,” Amadon explained. “So, initially we were working internally surrounded by a concrete cell up to level 25, but then we had to come out of that and switch from a four-sided support system to utilising a diving board system on the outside of the core.”

More options with Potain

These smaller, lighter cranes provided further benefits to a project that might once have relied on the use of larger, more costly models.

“By reducing the loads that are imposed, they give you the flexibility to come up with a different type of support system that’s not as cumbersome as would be needed to support a larger tower crane,” Amadon explained. “You can get great results working with an MR 608 (32 t maximum capacity) from the perimeter, but if you put a 24-ton capacity MR 418 into the core of a building with a shorter boom, you can pretty much get the same benefit.”

 

 

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